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London Will Have No Bisexual Groups In 2017 Pride Parade.


There's a little drama coming out of London this pride season and it's about what groups will be marching in the city's 2017 Pride Parade.  Some prides (and cities) limit the amount of floats and groups that can make up a parade. Although I've been to some pride parades that have lasted for more than 4 hours (thanks Austin, Texas!) because there didn't seem to be a limit, London has parameters.

There's also usually a designated sign-up time frame.  So what happens when no groups representing bisexuals are listed as official parade participants?  London is finding this out for themselves.

Does the city or pride organizers have something against bisexuals? Some think so. 

London Pride will feature no bisexual groups in this year’s parade, it has emerged.

Banks, corporations and TV fandoms have been given spots on the march, including Avengers’ fans and Bank of America.

However, there will be no group who specifically represent bisexual people as part of the parade, to be held on July 8, which is now full. Last year, Bisexuals + were part of the parade.

‘If there isn’t room for bi people but there is for companies briefly sporting a rainbow banner and chucking out lanyards, ur doing it wrong,’ Toby Walker tweeted.

Organisers said bi groups didn’t apply in time and it was ‘first come first served’.

Activist Lewis Oakley said: ‘The amount of young bisexuals (who are) about to realise just how invisible they are at this year’s Pride really makes me sad.

‘Pride is supposed to represent and celebrate us all.

‘If a bisexual group didn’t apply I feel it is their responsibility to put one together. It’s no secret bisexual people are hard to find, we are the least likely subgroup to be out.’

Activists online claimed the date for applications to march were closed early.

She said: ‘Not allowing any bi groups to march really displays London Pride’s institutional biphobia.

‘They didn’t think it was a failure on their part that no bi groups had approached them before they closed the deadline early, and they referred to a bi group’s subsequent request to march as “demanding”.

‘Imagine the outcry if no lesbian groups were allowed to march at an LGBT Pride.

. . .

A spokesman for London Pride commented on Twitter: ‘Groups need to represent themselves by applying. We are disappointed that no Bi groups applied on time. Over 50 groups are on a waiting list also. - metro.co.uk

I've marched in the Boston Pride Parade before and it was clear that there were rules and regulations on the size of the group, the floats, different fees for different sizes of floats, et cetera and so on. We knew there were deadlines and we had to meet them. 

What if no bi groups signed up? Should organizers hold a spot until the last day?

Should we limit the number of church groups, politicians, sponsors, beer companies?

Do we have to have a flow chart of the LGBT rainbow to make sure all parties have a seat at the table? Is it the job of Pride organizers to reach out to all aspects of the LGBT community to guarantee all parts are represented?

It is an issue that there will be no bisexual groups in the pride parade. But is there blame to be placed or do we just need to learn for next time?

Is there a possible solution for this year's parade?

What are your thoughts Instincters?

h/t: metro.co.uk

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I agree with the organizers.  They did not exclude anyone.  The bi groups excluded themselves.  It is not the organizers' fault that the groups did not bother to apply.  The idea that the organizers should have started a group because the established groups couldn't get their act together is absurd.  Maybe the bi groups should talk to Bank of America for advice.  They seem to know what they are doing.

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