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Notre Dame University Men Request Porn Filter for School Wi-Fi

Eighty male students of Notre Dame University wrote an open letter requesting that a porn filter is put in place on the school's Wi-Fi, according to the Daily Beast.

Jim Martinson, the man responsible for the initial writing of the letter has received over forty emails from students across the country saying that they too wish to have a porn filter in place on their school's Wi-Fi.

Amelia Irvine, a student at Georgetown University, said that Martinson's letter inspired her to request a porn filter for her school. She plans to write a letter and gather support for this cause in the upcoming semester. It is not just the religious schools that want this change, however. Such colleges as Harvard, Princeton, and University of Pennsylvania are on board with a porn filter, and students at Princeton and Penn handing out pamphlets highlighting the dangers of pornography. Martinson is optimistic that if the porn filter is placed on Notre Dame's Wi-Fi, other schools will follow suit. 

But is porn watching that big of a deal on college campuses? A 2013 study found that the average college student engaged with “arousal-oriented online sexual activity” less than once or twice a month, and a 2014 study strengthened the claim that porn viewing was infrequent, as many college students reported relatively infrequent watching of porn. 

The best indicator of whether or not people watch porn is their level of religiosity, so it's not surprising that the push for a porn filter was started in the religious segment of Notre Dame's campus. The letter itself was part of an annual anti-porn campaign created by the campus group called the Students for Child-Oriented Policy, or SCOP. The group claims to be nonpartisan but clearly holds a side, as it has hosted multiple anti-abortion talks on campus and circulated a petition urging people to disapprove of same-sex marriage. Martinson said that while the religious aspect of the ban is important to him, he wants to focus on porn addiction and the objectification of women because he believes that taking a secular stance on the matter will appeal to more people.

Many students felt that the way that women are treated in porn films is related to the current cultural climate and Jack Whelan, an anti-porn advocate in Princeton said that "it’s much easier to objectify women and to not see them as people when you’re simply viewing them as objects of sexual pleasure." 

Some feminists aren't too impressed by the push to ban porn, saying that it's patronizing to sex workers who engage in consensual acts. The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education - a group that once advocated from SCOP - said that since most porn is protected under the first amendment, banning it would be an infringement on freedom of speech. 

It seems to me that this banning of porn will most likely continue, as Tumblr recently announced that they will be banning all adult content on December 17 and since more and more schools will try to push for a porn ban, people will be left with two options: watch porn in the comfort of their own homes or use cell data to watch porn at school. Either way, I don't think porn watching is that much of an issue that it needs to be banned outright, but the bans won't most likely stop.


h/t: Daily Beast

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Notre Dame students hosted a porn festival that played Flaming Creatuers at the same time as the Supreme Court justice who had ruled against it was visiting for a Law School event. How things have changed! 

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