#PNP

Report Explores The Use and Sales of Illegal Drugs on Grindr

NBC News has published a report linking Grindr to the sale of illegal drugs.

The world of PNP has nearly destroyed my life many times over. Knock on wood I survived, but the damage it caused is something I have to live with for the rest of my life.

To anyone with experiences like mine, this is story old news—but many may very likely find it eye-opening.

In the report, NBC speaks with drug dealers about their use of Grindr to move product, relying heavily on widely understood code.

Some lingo in case you’re not in the loop. PNP = “Party and Play,” a term used to describe wild sexual activities enhanced by hard drugs — notably methamphetamine, GHB, cocaine and ketamine. This is also referred to as “chemsex” by some.

I’m in recovery, and thusly I can’t use Grindr ever again in my life. The sale and use of drugs is all over the place on the app. Common Grindr lingo for drugs: “T” means “Tina” the street name for meth, “Party” and “ParTy” or any emojis that look like something you’d find at a party usually imply hard drugs, especially meth.

A diamond or crystal emoji = crystal meth. Cloud emoji = meth clouds. Stay away if you value your health in the slightest.

When you’re high on crystal meth and other drugs, you become sexually voracious and uninhibited. You also quickly lose everything that’s important in life. And a lot of guys who get tangled up in it die. 

To NBC News, this is all apparently quite riveting, explosive and new. To me, it’s old hat.

It’s easy to buy drugs on Grindr. I did it a lot, back in the day.

Also, earlier this year we found out Grindr has been selling our [very] personal information like HIV status and sexual preferences with outside companies. 

Addiction is hell. PNP has a cute enough sounding name--but make no mistake: it can be DEADLY. Meth is one of the most addictive substances on the planet, and you’re damn lucky if it doesn’t kill you. It’s perfectly reasonable to be frustrated with Grindr for their lack of commitment to cleaning up and monitoring the world’s most popular gay dating app.

For the report: NBC News

h/t: Pink News

Does The Gay Community Normalize ChemSex?

Does The Gay Community Normalize ChemSex?


Do You PNP?

#INSTINCTAFTERDARK! In yet another article in my long line of topics not appropriate for work - or the day time - I want to touch base on this not-so-hidden world of ChemSex. ChemSex, or more commonly referred to as PNP (Party aNd Play) is honestly a topic this gay Millennial finds so common with the hook up culture. 


One time, I inadvertently wound up at a gay sex party. Basically, after months of convincing, I met this guy off a dating app and we went over to his place. He was up front his roommates would be there, but wasn’t so honest about what his roommates would be doing. Yeah, his roommates were having a full-on, about fifteen person orgy in their living room. There were a lot of towels, and a handful of guys around my age at the time- early 20s. At first, I participated in this so called party. It began with some drinking and smoking marijuana in underwear in one of the best homes I’ve ever been in. Why would I say no? Well, before I knew it, many of the guys were taking shots of GHB. I politely declined with judging eyes; there was a time and a place to try that, for me it was called college. Soon after, a new pipe and smell clogged my nose: The wicked scent of lust - or PNP. Uncomfortable, I put on my clothes and stepped on a balcony to chain smoke and text a friend. I went back inside hoping my online hookup would be a knight in shining armor, not partaking. His lips told a separate story from his actions. I left with some blue balls and one hell of a story. 


After years to think and plenty more experience in gay culture, I’ve came across a variety of men who PNP regularly. I’ve even had an attempt to be convinced it’s healthier for you than alcohol. On dating profiles, it’s publicly advertised...and partially accepted. 


Are we normalizing ChemSex culture? Is there something that may be done to prevent this from becoming the new normal? 

This post is the opinion of this contributing writer to Instinct Magazine. Opinion pieces do not always reflect the stance of the magazine or the other contributing writers.

This article was originally inspired by VICE.