Parent Upset About School Parade, Threatens to Take Legal Action

Heavers Farm Primary School in London believes that it is important to teach its students about LGBTQ issues and rights and, as such, created a pride event that encouraged children to celebrate what they're proud of. Inocuos enough surely, but not everyone is happy with it. Izoduwa Adhedo, mother of a Heavers Farm student complained that her son was forced to attend the pride event against her wishes and is threatening to take legal action against the school, according to BBC.

Adhedo is a member of Christian Concern, an Evangelical Christian group, and she was upset that the school made her son attend an event that "goes against" her Christian beliefs. She also said that she felt bullied by the school and said that "[The school] stopped treating me like any other parent but were antagonistic towards me… unreasonably excluding me from the premises, victimising my child and not taking my safeguarding concerns seriously." She claimed that she did not want to stop the pride event, she only wanted to prevent her son from being indoctrinated (presumably into the LGBTQ community).

The school commented that last year they held a pride event that encouraged students to celebrate what makes them proud to be themselves along with promoting anti-bullying and preventing anti-LGBT language. The older students were taught about LGBT history. Susan Papas, the head teacher of Heavers, said that in keeping with British values, the school prides itself on teaching about social topics such as black history, women's suffrage, and disability awareness – basically, they teach their students about diversity and inclusivity. Christian Concern is considering taking legal action against the school because of what I assume is LGBT topics. Despite these threats, the school is not backing down on teaching such topics because the administration feels that it is imperative that children learn about social issues.

Andrea Williams, the chief executive of the Christian Legal Centre believes that the school is pushing a certain agenda on children and that the students aren't being taught things that line up with their religious beliefs and that the way that Mrs. Adhedo was treated is "one of the most chilling breaches of parental rights I have ever seen." Ms. Papas commented that students aren't forced to attend any events but they are expected to attend every assembly so as to learn things that are not typically taught in an academic setting. 

It is nice to know that schools are taking the initiative and teaching children important social topics, but as with anything, there will be people who will object. But, as I said, it's definitely a good sign that such things are being taught in schools because it may help decrease prejudice against marginalized groups. 


h/t: BBC

What do you think?