Gay Parents

These Dads Revealed They’re Having Triplets In An Adorable Way

Jason Babcock and Adam Gentile are the happy couple who just announced that they are adding three more to their quickly growing family.

As GayStarNews reports, the two met at a college before getting married in Massachusetts on July 2013.

Then, they introduced their newborn son, Tristan, to the world just last year in January. Tristan was brought into their lives thanks to the help of their friend Jessica who agreed to be the surrogate.

But Jessica’s generosity didn’t stop there. She later told the boys that she was willing to be a surrogate for them again. Shortly after, the three had embryos fertilized and implanted again.

But, maybe Jessica is getting more than she signed up for, as now she’s going from birthing one child to birthing three at once!

That’s right, the three have found out that Jessica will be giving birth to triplets this time. Despite what a large surprise that announcement is, it’s also something to celebrate with glee.

And how did Jason and Adam celebrate? By announcing the triplets in an adorable Dr. Seuss inspired Instagram post, which you can see down below.

“We are extremely excited to announce that our family is growing exponentially,” Babcock wrote in the caption. “We are expecting triplets come May 2018! It’ll be a full house of laughter, love, and craziness!”

In all of the said craziness, the couple has remembered to be eternally grateful to their friend Jessica for helping them have a family.

“She is an angel, a blessing, just the best,” Babcock told GSN, “She does it simply because she believes we deserve a family the way anyone else does.”

Researchers Say They’re Halfway There To Artificially Producing Sperm

Scientist Azim Surani talked to the Progress Educational Trust annual conference in London this past month to share the results of his latest study.

The study, which is currently being reviewed for publication in a journal, followed Surani’s research team as they tried to produce an artificial sperm and eggs.

Surani was also pleased to share that the study went well and that they have progressed farther than anyone else in the process of making a sperm and egg.

As The Guardian reports, Surani says that his team was able to make it to the halfway point on the path of human stem cells turning into immature sperm/eggs. In order to do this, Surani’s team has tracked that path of human cells starting out the same and then branching off into sperm and eggs at around eight weeks.

“With this goal in mind, the team has developed miniature artificial testicles, called gonadal organoids, which comprise a blob of gonadal cells (also grown in the lab) suspended in gel. The mixture of cell types seems to be providing some of the right biochemical cues to propel the cells further down the path to becoming sperm.”

Despite being about halfway through the path process and understanding the complexities of it more than anyone else before, Surani says that they still have a long way to go.

On top of that, the extreme risks that any real life application of these artificial eggs and sperm is making Surani’s team continue on as slowly and carefully as possible.

“If this was ever going to be used in a clinical setting we have to be sure that it has gone through all the right stages – all of these steps are incredibly important,” said Surani, “You can make an egg that looks like an egg, but it might not be the right cell in molecular detail. You could get a lot of problems with that. You don’t want something that’s going to grow into some kind of abnormal structure.”

As for those real life applications, the eventual completion of this artificial sperm and egg process could mean a lot for people who can’t have children on their own.

Straight men and women who are infertile can produce using this science, but more importantly (for this site) the same can be said for same-sex couples.

“Two men could potentially have a baby that was genetically related to both by using skin cells from one to make an egg and cells from the other to make the sperm.”

With gay divorcees losing custody battles because the children aren’t biologically related to them, this could turn the tide towards building a firmer structure for gay parents.

That said, Surani says that they are at least ten years away from completing the research, so we all still have some time to wait on it.

This Couple Went Through Miscarriages & Fights With Surrogates Before Accidentally Having Two Children!

Terrell Joseph and Jarius Goudeau have gone through a rollercoaster ride as they tried to become parents.

Terrell (above, left) had grown up around children and knew that he “always had ‘baby fever.” Then, he met Jarius (above, right) and the two have enjoyed six wonderful years together.

During that time, they got engaged in 2014, adopted three beautiful dogs, bought a house together, and started their journey towards having children.

Sadly, the journey was not easy.

The plan was for the two to try having biological children first before adopting.

“We had this theory that if we were to adopt first, we’d probably never move forward with biological children—out of fear that our adopted son or daughter would feel they weren’t ’enough,'” says Terrell. “But if we did it biologically first, once they were a little older we’d adopt a toddler or elementary-age child that could feel love from us and their siblings.”

As such, they focused on at-home insemination, while using both of their sperm (and swearing to never ask who’s sperm fathered the future children).

The two then went through a miscarriage with their surrogate last year, but they stayed strong and determined to have a child. As such, they buckled down, struggled to find a new surrogate, and eventually found one willing to take the journey with them.

Then, imagine their surprise when the first surrogate announced that she was also pregnant.

That’s right, after they once fought to have a single baby, the couple found themselves having two.

 

When your kids are DROP DEAD GORGEOUS!!!

A post shared by Terrell & Jarius Joseph (@terrell.and.jarius) on

“At this point we didn’t know whether to jump for joy or crap a brick,” Joseph told NewNowNext. “We were expecting results from the new surrogate in just a few days.”

Thus, the two were graced with the (premature) birth of their son, Ashton, on July 27, 2017. After that, they were also blessed with the birth of their daughter, Aria, on September 9.

But that's not the end of thier story. Just the beginning.

After having their children, the two got married in January and formally introduced the "twins" to family and friends.

Now, every day is filled with joy and love, and the happy parents want to remind parent-hopefuls to stick in there during the turbulent times before birth.

“Don’t give up, and don’t let anyone stand in your way,” Terrell advised NewNowNext, “There could be some heartbreak and some ’No’ before you finally get your ’Yes.’ But in the end, you won’t even remember the struggle it took to get them here—you’ll only know the fuzzy feeling you get every time you look at them knowing you’re their world.”

h/t: NewNowNext

Watch: Trailer and Clip From Newly Released "Baby Steps"

All rights reserved to Gravitas Ventures

A couple days ago we talked about and showed you a clip for the Outfest judges winner The Wounded.

Today, we’re going to talk about Baby Steps. Baby Steps was a joint project between Taiwan and the U.S., but is only now being released digitally in America.

The story follows a gay Taiwanese-American man named Danny who, with his partner Tate, struggles to get a surrogate to give him the baby he so desperately wants. This is also complicated by Danny's mother who means well, but is also very controlling and thwarts the two during every step of the process.

The film has had limited releases such as at the Tribecca Film Institute, and has gotten some bad reviews based on the fact that it centers on a gay and interracial romance. But now that the film is releasing in Western internet waves, perhaps there will be a bigger audience appreciating the message behind the story.

If you want to see more of the film before potentionally buying it on Amazon, Google Play, or Itunes, you can check out trailers (the original trailer and one made for the Western release) and the clip down below.