“Men In Skirts” Events Are Taking Over Taiwan

Image via Facebook @板中學生會

Taiwanese students are going viral for making an LGBTQ-inclusive statement.

The Asian country became the first in the continent to legalize gay marriage. And while several same-sex couples are jumping the broom, other LGBTQ advocates are jumping on the bandwagon of another issue. Gender identity and expression.

Technically, the rise in conversations about gender identity and expression started at the top of the month. While most citizens waited to see the results on the marriage equality issue, some activists decided to take matters into their own hands.

讓性別教育不再只是口號謝謝老師們的協助板中男裙週 就在明天 和我們一起成裙結隊#板中男裙週 #裙聚效應#和我們一起成裙結隊

Posted by 板中學生會 on Sunday, May 5, 2019

此為本次活動每日中午於學校拍攝的活動照片,感謝老師及同學的熱情響應,讓我們能善加使用相機紀錄活動。 若有同學不願露面,煩請私訊粉專,我們將會盡快撤除。此相簿僅供個人儲存,非供新聞及商業用途,請務必多加注意。如有任何問題,歡迎私訊板中學生會粉絲專頁。

Posted by 板中學生會 on Thursday, May 16, 2019

Students across the country started to lead “men-in-skirts” events. For instance, students at the New Taipei Banqiao High School organized a week-long event in early May where male classmates attended school with skirts on. Even teachers joined in on the event. Principal Lai Chunjin later commended the student by saying the event was to “smash gender stereotypes.”

After photos from this school went viral, others schools, like the National Taiwan University, started creating similar events.

Posted by 汪詩豪 on Monday, May 13, 2019

“I thought to myself, if high school students are taking a stance like this, then we should be doing even more at a university to promote individual freedom and accept whatever it is that people want to wear,” said Political Science student Lin Huichu to The Observers and France Médias Monde.

He later added:

“Society can’t change that quickly, so we need to start by upending stereotypes, and show people that dresses, which can often limit women’s bodies and movements, aren’t just for women. We wanted to create a safe space for people who might feel like it’s not acceptable for them to wear dresses, and tell them, ‘Wear what you want, and no one will look at you strangely or laugh at you, and you can be happy.’”

“Around 50 to 70 people participated in the event. People stopped by to hear us talk on their way to class,” he shared. “We provided some skirts and dresses, some of which were from old high school uniforms. But a lot of guys came with their own dresses and wore them all day.”

“I received a lot of photos and videos from people who had participated. One of my friends said he didn’t want to wear a dress just to school, but to a movie, and wanted to see how society would react. People are happy that the dress, which is a very gendered symbol, is now starting to blur the lines between men and women.”

跟風一波!!!!

Posted by 張弼翔 on Monday, May 13, 2019

It seems with gay marriage now on the table, gender identity and expression are the next tasks to tackle in Taiwan.

h/t: The Observers

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