Mom Of Transgender Student Wins Our Hearts With This Pic. Virgina Does Not.

We love our moms.  And when we see examples of how moms support fellow LGBT members, it hits us right there.

 

Michelle Chapman and her transgender son Xander are ready for a fight.

The two, along with Xander’s girlfriend Taylor, are at the Virginia General Assembly right now ready to speak out against a proposed bill that would make it illegal for transgender students and adults to use the restroom aligned with their gender identity in public buildings, including schools.

“He had a huge amount of anxiety about even being in there,” said Chapman about her son in an email sent to GayRVA. “This ridiculous bill will effect these kids. So we fight.”

Xander and his mom are not alone today, as many are expected to speak out against the proposed bill which passed a subcommittee last week and heads for a full committee vote today.  – lgbtqnation.com

For more of the great coverage on the bill and from the story originally shared on February 4th story, go to GayRVA.com

Did the bill pass?  On Februatry 9th, GayRVA.com reported.

A bill which would have forced transgender Virginia students and citizens to use the restrooms aligned with their birth gender in all public buildings was killed in a House committee meeting today.

HB 781 aimed to require the Director of the Department of General Services and all state school boards to implement policies for every “public building on property that is owned, leased, or controlled by the Commonwealth and every public school restroom, locker room, and shower room that is designated for use by a specific gender” to be used solely by those whose “anatomical sex matches such gender designation.”

If anyone, including students, violates this policy, they would have been charged a $50 civil penalty, though that part was later amended to remove students from paying the fee. – gayrva.com

There are so many states, communities, and schools that are making it all up as they go with proposals of rules, laws, fines, etc.

What is the right answer in these cases?

Are there different answers for public and school bathrooms? 

Do the policies differ with the ages of the students?

What do you think?