Rhodes Bros start year off with a Call to Dad.

Another set of twins have decided to share their coming out story via youtube.  The Rhodes Bros, deep voiced, A&F looking twins stated they had come out to all of their other family members except their father.  They chose the beginning of the year to give dad a phone call and share their sexuality.

 With 2015 now here, we think it is time to finally just be ourselves. We hope by our actions today you can finish watching this video feeling encouraged and inspired. Thank you for all the support. We love you.

-The Rhodes Bros

 

It seems that the Rhodes Bros have a pretty good youtube following with over 56 thousand subscribers and release a new video every Sunday.  Those that follow them on Instagram may recall a July 2014 pic with Davey Wavey.  No, not everyone associated with Davey Wavey is gay, but there's a good chance (humor people). 

 

So the video below is a great example of two boys coming out to their very accepting father.  I remember coming out to my mother, she of course already knew, probably before I did.  We haven't had that conversation.  I came out to her over the phone as I drove to confront a cheating boyfriend, my first and worst, oh wait, he was a gay twin, too.  Anyways.  The acceptance of the Rhodes Bros dad reminded me of my mother's acceptance.  When it came to telling my father, I never did.  I told my mother that she could tell my father when she thought the time was right.  What I have seen, my dad's been pretty accepting of the whole difference. 

The Rhodes Bros father mentioned that he had been in a job for quite some time that has made him more accepting of differences.  It would be interesting to know what that job is.

All in all, congrats to the boys for coming out to their father.  But why is dad the last to know? to be told?  Was your father the last to know?  Are there members of your family that still do not know?  Grandparents? siblings?

 

 

55 thoughts on “Rhodes Bros start year off with a Call to Dad.”

  1. Oh thanks a lot!!! I just had
    Oh thanks a lot!!! I just had to listen to this in the morning before my coffee. My eyes won’t be dry for a week. I love u guys and applaud ur strength. I am 51 and told my Mother years ago
    The very next day , Rock Hudson died from AIDS complication. Of course my Mother came to the conclusion that I too was destined to such a death. We never talked about it again and my Father never knew. Oh well . you still have to make the best of the hand your felt. Your Father is wonderful guys. I wish you both total happiness.

    Reply
  2. I came out to my Jehovah
    I came out to my Jehovah Witness parents, when I was 19, I’m 48 now,. Back in the mid 80’s. The scare of AIDs
    Was prevelent, and no kind of support, I’m still ostersized by my parents and sister, but that is there hang up and I have had to grow thick skin, and Know that I’m as special as the others, I commend you both for being upfront and proud.

    Reply
  3. Wow I never had a dad to come
    Wow I never had a dad to come out to. I never knew him but I think what you two just did is amazing and I pray it inspirse others around the world. Thank you!!

    Reply
  4. Why is this news? Oh, yeah,

    Why is this news? Oh, yeah, it's because they are attractive. Let's hear about the ugly kids whose parents kick them out. They need us more.

    Reply
  5. I bet they were hot 5 years

    I bet they were hot 5 years ago. Their boyish features are leaving them. There dad probably rung out there holes a long time ago!

    Reply
    • Fred T. Hunter, don’t be

      Fred T. Hunter, don't be disgusting. It's that kind of comment that gives haters fuel for their fire & brimstone accusations and their skewed misrepresentations of GLBTQ people. 

      I mean, seriously, dude. These two young men are choking back tears in what is likely one of the most emotional moments in their young lives, and you just shit all over their feelings with your grotesque and insensitive words. It's not appropriate, even if you meant it as a joke. They don't know you, man. This isn't a joke to them. 

      Here are two innocent brothers, wrought with anxiety as they share this, their extremely emotional experience so it'll inspire others to live openly and honestly; but I promise you that they didn't mean what you're implying, you ornery, vile miscreant. Not funny.

      Rethink your comments and say something more appropriate after you do. You should apologize. Not cool, man. Not cool.

      Reply
  6. You both set an wonderful

    You both set an wonderful example of courage to be who you are to the world including your father

    and anyone else.  What you did takes a great deal of self trust and courage that facing the truth

    about who you are and being able to share that with someone who is so important in your lives

    makes your relationships with yourselves and others very real and intimate.  You both are

    great examples of what is means to be truthful to yourselves and others.  My hope for your

    both is that you will continue to lead lives filled with truth and honestly.

    Dr Quintano, Psychologist

     

    Reply
  7. the confession showed

    the confession showed powerful emotions and huge respect for fathers and im happy you did it… as for me i didn't need to come up because they knew the first time i walk and/or talk… they showed love as i grow specially if you were born in a family of three eldest brothers and me as the youngest… we are still loving each other and supporting as if everything is normal like it should be… thanks for sharing this is a perfect story of father's unconditional love to his children!! more power to both of you…

    Reply
  8. Though traumatic, this is

    Though traumatic, this is something that SHOULD be told in private and face to face. Phone calls are ok and I understand it's easier and still traumatic.

    BUT……

    At least they came out – a hump in life to overcome to be sure.

    KUDOS to both and to their Dad especially.

    Reply
  9. It is great that you had the

    It is great that you had the opportunity to come out to your dad. I grew up in a time when it was not the best of topics to discuss in Australia. I did not have the opportunity to come out to my Mum whome I know would be accepting BUT I know my father would have hated me for it. I did get married and had a baby girl she is now 26 and hates me like the plague. I came out to my ex wife and my daughter after going through suicidal depression. If I did not do it I would not be alive today and if I stayed behind closed doors My ex and daughters lives would have been miserable along with mine. I had to make the decision to come out to them knowing that I may not see them again. My daughter still hates me after telling them in 2006 about who I am. I thought time would change her but it has not so I have gotten on with my life. I am married to My Beautiful Patrik he is 24 and I am 64 and we have been married now for 3 years and still going strong. I hope one day to have a baby who will grow to love me as a child loves their father. I moved from Australia to Slovakia and am happy with Patrik and finally found a place where I belong.

    I hope and wish every thing Bright and Wonderful for you guys and to live a beautiful life. If or when you have children I am sure they will grow to love you because your love is a very SPECIAL LOVE one that god gave to us as his special gift.

     

    Reply
    • This is a truly touching

      This is a truly touching story I am not far behind you in age so for you to find love and happiness is wonderful.Many blessings to you and your partner in marriage.

      Reply
  10. As a person who’s been

    As a person who's been through the process of coming out to his parents (and to everyone else) I appreciate the power of the emotions that can be involved in it. That doesn't negate the rank exhibitionism of people who conduct what used to be considered "personal lives" on YouTube, not only exposing themselves but dragging their families and others into it as well.

    Reply
    • I used to share this

      I used to share this sentiment on privacy. I used to think that this sort of thing, (coming out), was best kept private. And if that's what makes a person comfortable, then by all means they should come out in a private setting. But considering that these brothers didn't record video of their father as they told him, and they merely shared the audio of his reaction, I don't think they did anything wrong. His anonymity is still intact, and they were able to share their experience with the purpose that they stated in the beginning and end of the video: they intended to inspire others to live their own truth.

      It's a powerful message that many young people need to hear. It's so much better to watch video of something like this rather than news footage or social media posts about another teenager who took their own life out of desperation and their own inability to reconcile who they are with who they feel they're expected to be. The act of coming out and how to come out should be a personal choice.

      Twenty years ago I came out to my mother quietly, but in a public place because we were having lunch when I decided to tell her. Incidentally, there were two queens sitting behind us, giggling their asses off as they eavesdropped while I sweated bullets and choked on my words. Later, I couldn't muster the courage to come out to my sister, but she picked up on subtle clues and confronted me about the rainbow sticker on my car. My father and I didn't really discuss it but it was understood that he knew and he was understanding even if he didn't approve.  It's different circumstances for everyone. They have to address it when and how they feel most comfortable. Some people never do. I applaud the twins for their pluck and courage.

      Reply
  11. Such a moving moment to sit

    Such a moving moment to sit here and watch you both tell your father. You are now able to move mountains , grow and become the two wonderful human beings that your meant to be. Your father I'm sure is very proud of you young men.

    Reply
  12. More important than sharing

    More important than sharing my own story or response, I wanted to share that I truly just feel moved by the stories you have been able to elicit from everyone, from your entire audience. With the multitude of unhappy feelings people feel and then choose to express online nowadays, it's so INCREDIBLY refreshing and amazing to be able to scroll through and read comments of everyone being honest, vulnerable, and willing to share their own moments of strife and growth- What you two have done is something I can't imagine having to do, but the sort of human response to what you have done- that is true beauty. I encourage the both of you to continue to find ways of eliciting such responses, because it's pretty incredible. Happy 2015 !

    Reply
  13. I cried so hard… I know

    I cried so hard… I know that most of been one of the hardest things for both of you to do. I never came out to my father and now that he has passed I will never have that chance.

    Reply
  14. I can relate to this story

    I can relate to this story alot I came out to my Familyand Friends in 1997.  They all took it very good in fact most already knew.  But the hardest was to tell my Dad and what was the hardest was that my dad is a Jehovah's Witness.  My mom and dad divorced when I was 13 so they were both remarried when this happen.  So when I went to tell my Dad and step mom the reaction was not good. Infact the conversation went as followed.  "Well son who know that mine and your relationship will have to come to and end.  Being that I am a Jehovah's Witness and an Elder of a congergation  I can not accept this".  Well long story short my relationship with my dad today is great, after a few months after coming out to him I received a message from him telling me how much he loves me.  We don't talk about me being gay or is it ever brought up in conversation in his presence, but I feel I have to respect his position with his religion.  So I guess our relationship is more of a mutual understanding we respect each others lives but we dont discuss it. So thank you for share this inspiring story.

    Reply
    • Well I guess you’re the lucky
      Well I guess you’re the lucky when dealing with JW parents. I’ve not been so lucky. My mother/step father wouldn’t allow me in their house and have since moved 2 1/2 hrs away from where I grew up so that they’ll never have to see me again. This religion is a cult (I was in it for 20 yrs!) I miss my mother so much it hurts but this is their choice not mine.

      Reply
  15. You guys made me laugh of joy

    You guys made me laugh of joy! I wish You guys the very best I know what it feels like to have a Million pounds lifted off of you! Here's to 2015 may it bring joy and happiness as it has brought me and you both! Continue your journey in raising awareness and giving others the strength to find their inner peace and happiness!!!

    Reply
  16. As a Gay father of two

    As a Gay father of two awesome grown boys, (men now) I never hid my lifestyle from them, EVER. To hide it would have meant that I was ashamed of myself, it would have, in a round about way, have made them think it was ok to be ashamed of whatever they wanted to be if it wasn't "normal". I love my guys, with every ounce of my soul, and they love me, they are both straight, one is married and I have an awesome grand daughter. I have always been a big part of their lives and so haven't my partners. Honesty, loyalty annd trust are very important in our family, my ex-wife and I are very very good friends. My partner of 14 yrs died 15 yrs ago, he loved my boys and they him. They lived with us up until he became to sick with AIDS. I sent my boys to live with their mother during that period because I didn't want them nor did my partner to have to witness the horrible effects that CMV of the Brain causes. This year is my 30th year of living with AIDS, I am a survivor, Your need to tell your father, and your video, your honesty and your integrity will get you far in life and will save many young lives. As a former public speaker, educator of HIV/AIDS, Equality and acceptance I hope and pray everyday that younger people can find the strength to tell their parents like you instead of taking their own lives. I also hope that parents that are told by their children about their lifestyle understand that there is no fault to be placed on anyone, themselves included, Be proud of your children, be proud of your parents, there is already so much hate in this world. Lets not hate within our own family unit, because when we are in our last moments of life on this side of heaven, family is all that matters. Congrats to you two handsome young men, be happy, love hard, be safe and remember your Dad loves you. 

     

    Reply
  17. I came out to my family at

    I came out to my family at age 26 and they were pretty much ok with it. They decided dad didn't need to know (he's an alcoholic and we've never been close.) He found out from a distant relative (several years later) and when we ran into each other at my sister's house he didn't say one word to me! Lucky for these twins, they have a loving, caring father!

    Reply
  18. Aww you made me cry!!! So

    Aww you made me cry!!! So proud of you two young men& what an amazing father!! Always remember what he said…"you are normal" don't let anyone say differently! 

    Reply
  19. Wow so proud of you both. You

    Wow so proud of you both. You are so inspiring. Your parents should be so proud. They are from my hometown I believe. 

    Reply
  20. Congrats!  Great courage and

    Congrats!  Great courage and love.  Glad you have each other and now your Dad.

    Blessings; have a great life.  Thanks for what this will mean for other people.  

     

    Reply
  21. I’m glad that their father

    I'm glad that their father took it well and I'm glad they found the courage to come out.  I do wonder though if moments like this are things that should maybe shouldnt be broadcasted to the world.  Some things maybe should be private moments.  My parents took my coming out as well as parents can take such a thing, but I would never want it (my coming out conversation)s)) put on the internet for the world to see.  

    Maybe thats just me though?  Like i said, glad it worked out for them!

     

    Reply
  22. I came out to my mother 2
    I came out to my mother 2 years before my father. She, who had always been my best friend struggled with it. We are close and now she calls Devesh her son-in-law (my partner of 20 years). When I finally told my Dad he cried and said he had been waiting since I was 2 years old for me to tell him. I have love all around me, I know that isn’t everyone’s story but I am proud of mine.

    Reply
  23. AWWWW this is the sweetest

    AWWWW this is the sweetest coming out video i've seen thus far. A complete contrast to me coming out to my dad and stepmom. Their reaction was to get the cops and a court order to have me removed from their home and lives. Just soooooo happy about your dad's reaction – he's a Hero Dad in my eyes. AND HOW HANDSOME YOU BOTH ARE!  Please find good partners, always use condoms and get tested every 6 months lol ! #gaypower LOVE YOU GUYS!

    Reply
  24. Hi I’m so glad for you guys!!

    Hi I'm so glad for you guys!!!!  I was out to just close family at 24.  I told my dad when I was 30 we did not talk much but it did not go well…  

    God Bless You Both!!!!

    Greg Bates JR

    Reply
  25. Thanks, guys.  You are both

    Thanks, guys.  You are both charming and any Daddy would be proud to be associated with you. 

    Reply
  26. Hi guys I know how hard it is

    Hi guys I know how hard it is to come out to your dad myself came out to my father when I was in collage it was hard for me but he told me he still love me and will be there for me that was 11 yrs ago on dec 3 2014 he gave me away  at my wedding to my wonderful husband right before he past away 

    Reply
  27. Very proud of you.  Even

    Very proud of you.  Even though I'm a great deal older than you, it makes me realize that it's still hard to come out.  I felt the same way when I came out to my parents.  You'll never regret being true to yourself.  All my best. Paul

    Reply
  28. Your story is heart warming.

    Your story is heart warming.  It is what thousands of young people have faced in the past and will face in the future.  You grasped that challenge in a caring and respectful way that resulted in gaining you respect and love back.  Having gone through this I can assure you have jumped a major hurdle in the journey to being a good person.  You certainly have my respect.  PS you are also hot.

     

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  29. So happy for you guys.

    So happy for you guys.
    Your Dad accepts you no matter what. (The way family should always be)
    Love from Florida

    Reply
  30. I couldn’t come out to my dad

    I couldn't come out to my dad, I had to have my mum tell him for me. His response to her was, "I've known for years. He's still my son and I love him"

    I sat down with my dad one day and asked him, "How would you feel if I brought home a partner?", he asked, "You mean a boyfriend?", I told him "yes".
    He replies with, "You can't ask for anything of your children. For them to be male or female, straight or gay. All you can hope is that they'll be happy. And if this person makes you happy, then I want to meet him".

    I can't write this now without crying because not only does the weight come off when you come out, but to know they support and encourage you is absolutely beautiful.

    Thanks for sharing your story.

    Reply
  31. Congrats ya takes a lot Of

    Congrats ya takes a lot Of guts to come out to your dad be proud of who u are welcome to the family Homos lol!!!! ya so adorable !!! 

    Reply
  32. Good on you fella’s yes it is

    Good on you fella's yes it is a huge weight taken off your shoulders I have always been a big believer that you have to come out when you are ready NO one should make you come out… I come out in my late 20's I'm now 47 and my step father still two the day catch deal with it. My father past away when I was a baby and my step father adopted me when he married my mother he was a policeman in NSW Australia. When I was growing up it was still a legal to be gay in the 70's so it made very interesting conversation around the dinner table on how my step father would lock up the dirty filthy fagots. I ended up moving away from all my family when I hit my 20's to find myself without all the bullshit so to speak. I can out to my bother and step sister first I spoke to my youngest step sister around how I didn't know have to tell dad. She told me not to worry about it she would tell him in which she did needless to say it did not go down well nor did it go down well with my work at the time which ended up with me having to leave my employment. Now 23 years later my partner Don and I have been together for 12 years in April my step father (dad) still has never meet Don the sad thing is that he has put one big wedge in our family. If anything ever happens to my mother then I'd have no hesitation in walking away from him.

    You are both very lucky that your father loves you no matter what and just remember family is a big part of your life.

    Wish you both a happy future regards

    Taz

    Reply
  33. You  broke my heart when you

    You  broke my heart when you both broke down before you actually told dad. I'm happy for you that he is who and how he is in respect to his unconditional love for you. Loved when he said, "Just stop it."  May your example encourage others who need to "come out."

    Reply
  34. I am so deeply glad things

    I am so deeply glad things turned out better than expected. Maybe I should have had you call my parents. Your story gives me hope and something to believe in. Thank you both..

    Reply
  35. That was so awesome!! I’m

    That was so awesome!! I'm proud of you both!! Now you are on your way to a very full and rich life!! Congratulations!!! You are much stronger now. 

    Reply
  36. I’m glad they were brave

    I'm glad they were brave enough to come out. Congratulations to both.   I could have done without the Davey Wavey part, however.  

    Reply
  37. Dear Adam,

    Dear Adam,

    Thank you for bringing this story to our attention!  As a "published" writer you should not that there is not "s" at the end of the word anyway.  It makes you sound uneducated.

    Thank you,

    Carlos

    Reply
    • Hey Carlos,

      Hey Carlos,

      If you're going to take time to critique someone online, at least make sure to spell all of your own words correctly.

       

      Thank you,

      The rest of the internet.

      Reply
    • Thanks for the comment Carlos

      Thanks for the comment Carlos. I try to type these blogs in my spare time, while working on my PhD.  Anyways was fine to use in that paragraph since the tone was not serious, more of a "whatever."  But if it's good enough for the NY Times, it's good enough for me. See below.

      Anyway vs. anyways

      Anyways is a colloquial variant of the adverb anyway. It has a casual tone and may be considered out of place in formal or serious writing. In such contexts, anyway is safer.

      Although considered informal, anyways is not wrong. In fact, there is much precedent in English for the adverbial -s suffix, which was common in Old and Middle English and survives today in words such as towardsoncealways, and unawares. But while these words survive from a period of English in which the adverbial -s was common, anyways is a modern construction (though it is now several centuries old).

      Anyways is sometimes useful for creating an informal or colloquial tone, which may be what these writers have in mind:

      Anyways, it’s time to move on. [NY Times]

      Whatever. Home Improvement sucked anyways. [Bleacher Report]

      But in writing that is not intended to have a colloquial tone, anyway works in its place—for example:

      Why is Google building a Google phone, anyway? [The Atlantic]

      It can be nearly impossible to see from publicly available data which banks are extending or restructuring loans they believe will one day fail anyway. [Wall Street Journal]

      Anyway, I think it’s pretty hard to make a bad Hurley episode. [Chicago Tribune]

      http://grammarist.com/usage/anyways/

      Reply
  38. I am so happy how this went

    I am so happy how this went for the both of you it's truly amazing to have a father who loves you unconditionally unfortunately mine does not and disowned me. It has been over two years since we last spoke but I have learned in that two years that he is the one who is at a loss and not me I have a wonderful new family and an incredible husband I wish you both nothing but the best that life has to offer you go after it and get it

    Reply
  39. wow, that went better than i

    wow, that went better than i thought it would have, much different from the day i came out, to my family. Lord what i went through with my family, was enough to make me want to die. I decided to come out because i was tired of living a lie, and live the life my mother wanted me to do. I was called everything in the book, slapped around, called fag, queer, it got so bad i finally moved away. I have settled alot of those feelings many years ago, and now am a every proud gay man. My one saving grace through it all was my grandparents, never referred to me as gay, or homo, granny always said, " you know the way you are,"  I have always loved my family and have to a point regained there love. congrats guys.

     

    Reply
    • Now I understand why one of

      Now I understand why one of the most important words in the lexicon of lesbian, bi, trans, gay, questioning, and other marginalized persons is: "PRIDE."  You gentlemen bring great pride and dignity to the reality of a life that for too many has been abused, mistreated, and condemned.  All of us are unique, different.  Each of the unique facets of humanity are clearly an indication that the "Creator" desires diversity.

      As a priest and counselor, I have had the opportunity to hear the sacred stories of many of God's gay and lesbian children…. each one beautiful and holy, as they each reflected a glimpse of God's essence.  Sadly, many of them have been so damaged and wounded that their lives became a living hell of addictions and disease and loneliness and self-hatred.  In fact, the first young man I met who happened to have AIDS was in a hospital after a suicide attempt.  His father beat him up and threw him out of the house after he told his Dad he was gay.  He then went out and tried to kill himself.

      You are to be so highly commended for your courageous witness of Truth and Love.  And your Dad is to be commended as well.  You have a father any one of us would be proud to know…. 

      May you continue to live in a new freedom and blessing; in a world with more abundant light and vitality.  For a great new light has been shone into the world for all of us because you were willing to move out of the shadows of the darkness.  God bless you so very much.   Thank you, thank you, thank you.

      I pray for you and your family.  And I pray that others who are lost or in hiding may hear your words and see your tears and know that 'the truth will set us free,' and only in real freedom can the fullness of Love be experienced.  It is indeed the love of God, which God desires for ALL!

      peace to you and to all whom you have touched….

      fr. greg corrigan

      wilmington, de

      quierespaz@gmail.com

      Reply

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