Pride

India Celebrates 10th Annual Pride Despite Being Illegal

November 12th marked the 10th Annual New Delhi Pride, where members of the LGBTQIA community, allies and activists came together to show that love is love. In India, gay sex is still illegal punishable with up to 10 years in prison.

But that didn't stop the hundreds who marched regardless of the danger of persecution.

Reigning RuPaul's Drag Race All-Star champion Alaska Thunderfuck was part of the New Delhi Pride festivities, appearing at the popular Kitty Su nightclub.

Check out these videos and images of how India is celebrating pride.

 

Favorite shot from today. #delhipride

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#gaypride2017 #gaypride #proudpride #gay #queers #rainbowpride #lovewin #baelove #myloves #delhiqueerpride2017

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Hot couple with a hot placard! #delhiqueerpride2017 #quirky #posters #instapicture

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happy pride :) #DelhiPride

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Happy Pride, India!

Brisbane Pride Was Led By LGBTQ Indigenous People For The First Time

Image via QNews

The Brisbane Pride Festival happened a couple days ago to great fanfare.

While you would think all talk would be about the fact that Australia is currently in the middle of a popular vote to potentially legalize Marriage Equality, the real talk at Brisbane Pride was on its efforts towards diversity and unity.

One of the biggest acts that the pride event did towards that effort was to invite Queensland’s LGBTI First Nations community as the lead of this annual festival.

More than 3,000 attendees attended the event and witnessed something special and historic. First Nation Elders came to Brisbane Pride and participated in a flag exchange ceremony.

During the flag exchange, those elders exchanged the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags with the rainbow flag of the LBGTQ community in a symbolic gesture representing deep mutual respect.

Before the event, Rebecca Johnson of the IndigiLez Women’s Leadership and Support Group, said that this year’s Brisbane Pride would be a historic one.

“As the oldest continuing culture in the world, First Nations people will be recognized and respected by the Brisbane Pride Committee,” Johnson said.

“As a community we will be witnessing history, the start of a journey that embeds Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural protocol and the development of meaningful relationships through a cultural lens.”

In addition, Deejee Hancock, the president of Brisbane Pride, announced how honored everyone was to be invited for the flag exchange.

“The exchange of flags is one of the highest honors between two cultures, symbolizing a commitment between them to honor and learn from each other with the common goal of inclusiveness, support and mutually shared values,” he said.

“The culture and traditions of the LGBTI community are unique and important to us, and the opportunity to both share and learn from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and create a mutual protocol of respect is a unique opportunity for both cultures. We will be seeing history made and there is no greater reason to be proud.”

 “I couldn’t be more honored on behalf of Brisbane Pride and the Brisbane rainbow community. I’m overwhelmed to be part of something so amazing and historical,” he said.

That said, while there was an acceptance and merging of cultures, there was still some conflict. A group of six anti-gay religious protestors walked at the front of the parade, but were drowned out by chants like, “love is love,” and “preach love, not hate.”

 

Biggest Brisbane Pride March Ever!! Such an amazing proud day for us al!! #voteyes #brisbanepridefestival #brisbanepride

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Gays For Trump Will March With 'Deplorable Pride'

Earlier this year, Charlotte-based Republican LGBT group Deplorable Pride, were denied a spot in the city’s annual Charlotte Pride parade. The group was denied participation in the city's largest parade because of their planned 27-foot-long float that would depict a drag version of Melania Trump with others wearing long blue evening gowns that read "Make America Great Again" reports the Charlotte Observer. Now, the Gays for Trump group is planning to protest 30-minutes prior to the parade.

A statement on the group's website reads:

Come and show your support for your fellow Trump supporters who are LGBT and are being persecuted by their own gay community. Please help us show that intolerance is not acceptable.

A spokesperson for Charlotte Pride has commented about the organization's right to not include those who exclude others from American society.

The statement by Charlotte Pride reads:

In the past, we have made similar decisions to decline participation from other organizations espousing anti-LGBTQ religious or public policy stances. Charlotte Pride envisions a world in which LGBTQ people are affirmed, respected, and included in the full social and civic life of their local communities, free from fear of any discrimination, rejection, and prejudice.

Charlotte police is prepared for the protest and what it could mean for spectators and visitors to the highly popular pride event.

'Secret Pride' in Iran Will Have First Public March

In Iran a “Secret Pride” has been celebrated since 2010. The event calls for individuals from an LGBTQ group to take photos around Tehran, the country’s capital, holding rainbow symbols and with their faces concealed. Being gay is punishable by death in Iran and exposing their identities as queer individuals is a large risk for persecution. Which is why “Secret Pride” has become one of the only forms of expression this group of Iran’s LGBTQ people can be ‘themselves’.

This year’s “Secret Pride” will be on July 28th and it has been coined Ranginkamaniha (Rainbow Friday).

According to Queerty, organizers have said:

We are believing in the power of happiness, miracle of hope and the strength of colors, even in this world of superficiality and helplessness. Our grief is not dimmed, but we, the rainbows of Iran are screaming our happiness as a shape of resistance and we keep our euphoria alive as the torch of justice. Awareness is brightness and by that we will take back our days from the night we all have drowned in, more than ever. Because we believe that humankind is remedial, and human being is beautiful and kind as strong as that can be relied on it. It’s possible to overcome ignorance that dominates the world.

This year, LGBTQ activists from Iran will not only take part in Ranginkamaniha,but publicly march with a float in Amsterdam’s Canal Pride parade on August 5th. While their faces will still be concealed for their own safety, the group will march with pride, shattering barriers within their own country and beyond.

Organizers have shared more about this:

We, as an Iranian queer community out of Iran, are going to come out of closet and prove that we are not ashamed of ourselves and we are proud of who we are. We will be marching behalf of the Iranian LGBTIQ community and behalf of everyone who has no voice and no face. We will be showing visibility of the hope and the dream. That’s why we are here to make our dream come true.

Here are some images from Iran’s “Secret Pride” throughout the years:

H/T: Queerty