#PrideFlag

A Virginia Grandmother Goes Viral After Ironing Her Grandchild's Bisexual Pride Flag

A Virginia grandmother went viral after her granddaughter shared the image of a loving gesture.

This past weekend, a woman named Lexie tweeted out a picture of her grandmother ironing her bisexual pride flag before she headed out to Washington, D.C.’s Pride.

In the tweet, which now has 34,300 comments, 239,000 likes, and 33,000 retweets, she wrote:

“I got up this morning to get ready for #DCPride. My grandma walked into my room, looked at my bi flag, and said, ‘Oh, this needs to be pressed out!’ Such a simple gesture, but it holds so much love and meaning for me.”

After she noticed that the original tweet was going viral, she sent out a second tweet explaining that she once was afraid to come out to her grandmother. That makes this gesture all the more meaningful.

Then finally, she tweeted out a third time to share a selfie with her grandmother while saying, “here’s another picture of my grandma because I want the world to see how beautiful she is! Show her some love! Happy pride y’all.”

h/t: NewNowNext

Could the Pride Flag be Offensive?

A woman in Brevard County, Florida received a surprising email from her HOA at Rockledge’s Ashwood Lakes community. The message was requesting that she remove the Pride rainbow flag that had been flying in front of her home for over two years.

Jenifer Raymond shared with WFTV 9 Orlando that her landlord received an email from a member of the neighborhood’s architectural review committee that only American, state, or military flags are allowed to be flown.

Raymond told WFTV:

It's a symbol of acceptance, tolerance and equality. They're saying it's offensive. To me, that's like saying I'm offensive because I exist.

Based on the community bylaws, the flag was deemed offensive and detrimental to the subdivision it also read the following:

Allowing the flag to be flown is setting a precedence for other homeowners to fly other offensive flags -- for example, the Confederate flag.

Meanwhile, other flags were found in the neighborhood which included one that displayed a flower, a Florida Gators flag, and a Thin Blue Line flag in support of law enforcement. Did these residents also receive this email? If flags are not specifically limited in the HOA bylaws, this could definitely be considered discrimination.

After the incident gained some statewide attention, Raymond received an apology from the HOA and stated that she can fly the rainbow flag for as long as she chooses.

According to WFTV, Robert Kelso, Vice President of the HOA, sent Raymond an email that read:

I thank you for contacting me this afternoon, as I and the rest of the Ashwood Lakes Homeowners Association, were unaware of the erroneous assertions of one of our ARC committee members. Board members contacted the property owner and his tenants to inform them that the rainbow flag is both acceptable to the board and welcome in Ashwood Lakes. Appropriate steps are underway to prevent a similar recurrence in the future.